A 3D replica reveals the face of Queen Nefertiti, King Tut’s mother

In a historic reconstruction project, Josh Gates, investigator enables us to discover the face of King Tut’s mother for the first time. The sculpture provides an accurate depiction of her appearance in life and bolsters the theory that the 3,400-year-old mummy of King Tut’s biological mother, nicknamed the “Younger Lady,” is also Queen Nefertiti.

As a reminder, Nefertiti is known as one of the most beautiful women in history, however, for Gates, her accomplishments are anything but skin deep. The pharaoh ruled during one of the most prosperous times in the ancient world.

Gates and the “Expedition Unknown” team, along with Egyptologist Dr. Aidan Dodson of Bristol University, have investigated three famous women in ancient Egypt – Hatshepsut, Cleopatra and Nefertiti.

Host of ‘Expedition Unknown,’ Josh Gates examines the sculpture of the “Younger Lady” mummy in the Paris studio of paleoartist Elisabeth Daynès. (Travel Channel)

How 3D technology is used to bring out the “perfect” replica of Queen Nefertiti

Using a 3D imaging technology, the queen’s face was digitally mapped to create a replica of her head. With this model and forensic analysis, paleoartist Elisabeth Daynès, (who recreated King Tut in 2005), sculpted a lifelike bust of the Younger Lady’s face. The striking result was then analyzed against well-known images of Queen Nefertiti.

The facial reconstruction of the “Younger Lady” mummy next to a 3D replica of its head created from digital mapping. (Travel Channel)

This remarkable face seems to be consistent with ancient representations of Nefertiti,” said Dodson. “It’s extraordinary. When taken alongside the latest reading of the genetic data, this provides us with truly exciting evidence that the mummy of the Younger Lady is none other than Queen Nefertiti herself.

Elisabeth Daynès explained the complexity of the project. It was very important to determine accurate muscle, skin and soft tissue depth. Everything was meticulously calculated by hand. It required about 500 hours to create the bust. “When you overlay the profile of the reconstruction with the famous Berlin Bust of Nefertiti, they are an incredibly close match, “said Elisabeth.

Detailed information are not given about the use of 3D technology.

The discovery will be featured on Travel Channel in a two-part special of the series “Expedition Unknown” with Josh Gates, airing on Wednesday, February 7 and February 14 at 9 p.m. ET/PT.

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