Recent figures indicate that breast cancer affected about 14.1 million people in 2012. According to the American Breast Cancer Foundation, in 2017, 252,710 cases in women would be diagnosed against 2,470 in men.

The need of an accurate detector is then absolutely essential to prevent the disease and ensure the survival of people.

Researchers at the University of Twente (UT) in the Netherlands teamed up with Ziekenhuis Groep Twente to implement the 3D printed Stormram 4, the latest robot created especially to collect cells for biopsy. According to these researchers, it is not possible to achieve this robot’s rate of precision by hand.

Use of the 3D printed detector

With the MRI Data method (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), the formation of cells within the breast could be efficiently mapped. The data enables to guide a needle for sample cell collection, which can be done more efficiently when performed mechanically.

Made of plastic, the Stormram 4 is printed with a high-resolution polyjet 3D printer. It comprises a simple cart and rail system; and possesses a MRI compatible needle clipped to the top.

The Stormram 4 pneumatic control system. Photo via the University of Twente

A system of dials enables to control movements along both x and y axis by pneumatic power provided through a connection to tubes. Last but not least, according to preliminary tests, the device can realize sub-millimeter precision in needle placement.



 

 

Corporate communication and content marketing specialist at 3D Adept, Kety has a great interest in technological innovations, precisely for the scope of 3D printing on different sectors of activity. In order to take advantage of it, a wide range of innovations still have to be discovered about the technologies that shape the world of tomorrow.